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The Raisina Dialogue is India’s premier conference on geopolitics and geoeconomics committed to addressing the most challenging issues facing the global community. Every year, leaders in politics, business, media, and civil society converge in New Delhi to discuss the state of the world and explore opportunities for cooperation on a wide range of contemporary matters. The Dialogue is structured as a multi-stakeholder, cross sectoral discussion, involving heads of state, cabinet ministers and local government offcials, who are joined by thought leaders from the private sector, media and academia.

The conference is hosted by the Observer Research Foundation in partnership with the Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India. This effort is supported by a number of institutions, organisations and individuals, who are committed to the mission of the conference.

This year, the conference will be hosted in a hybrid format with in-person conversations and digital discussions.

Pillar Icon #VIRALWORLD:
OUTBREAKS, OUTLIERS AND OUT OF CONTROL

An already strained international institutional architecture is facing its worst crisis of legitimacy yet, having been unable to prevent pandemics, financial crises, and conflicts over the years. The United Nations framework is struggling to equitably distribute decision making authority and is being undermined by great power competition, including both responsibility abdication and institutional capture. Will post-COVID political realities hasten the demise of this system? Or will it compel leaders and communities to renew investment in international institutions and global solutions?

The intersection of emerging technologies, globalization and national security will dominate discussions in policy circles around the world in the years ahead. Decoupling is now a serious and significant political and economic endeavour. Many warn of a new period of de-globalization, with state’s instinctively ‘re-shoring’ industrial and technological capabilities to guard against the weaponization of interdependence . But is this the only way forward? Can democracies use this moment to restructure, “smart shore” and “safe shore” supply chains, creating, in the process, new trust and resilience in the flows of ideas, technology, and people?

If the international order has an essential function, it is the provision and defence of global public goods – including peace and security. For decades, enforcement of this mandate has been the privilege of a select few great powers. Yet that status quo is increasingly unviable: inter-state and intra-state conflict is accelerating, including in new domains such as the biosphere and digital frontiers. How can the international community hold to account those responsible for exacerbating climate change, cross border terrorism, cyber-vulnerability, global pandemics and a range of “public bads”? Does the political will exist for collective interventions in a multipolar world defined by strong emerging states, trans-national corporations and networked communities? Which geographies, revisionist nations and disruptive actors require special and focused attention?

A seemingly inescapable consequence of our increasingly digital societies is the vitiation of our public spheres by misinformation—be it organic, inadvertent, or sponsored by foreign actors. The era of post-truth politics is a global pandemic that is here to stay. Will nations and societies fall victim to their political and information silos? Or, as in the case of health emergencies, can targeted and consistent interventions in public cyber-hygiene, business responsibilities, necessary cyber-security infrastructure, and international best practices limit the contagion of misinformation? More worryingly, how will communities resist pressure from the government to share their personal information for the ostensible reasons of public health and safety?

It is inevitable that governments will undertake a range of fiscal and economic measures to ameliorate the damage of the coronavirus pandemic. Can public leaders leverage this moment to accelerate green transitions by targeting stimuli in sectors that are likely to support the SDGs and the Paris agreement? Will we now see attention turning towards gender-led growth and investment in a new community of leaders who are shaping our key sectors including health, education, and food and nutrition? And will the pandemic compel states to create new legal and administrative tools to provide appropriate paycheques, purpose and protection for an increasingly informal and insecure global workforce? Will a ‘New Green Deal’ emerge anchored in a robust partnership between the planet, people, technology and enterprise?

SPEAKERS
Aakanksha Tangri

Aakanksha Tangri

Founder and Editor-in-Chief, Re:Set, UAE

Aakanksha Tangri

Founder and Editor-in-Chief, Re:Set, UAE
Abdulla Shahid

Abdulla Shahid

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Maldives

Abdulla Shahid

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Maldives
Admiral Karambir Singh

Admiral Karambir Singh

Chief of the Naval Staff of the Indian Navy, India

Admiral Karambir Singh

Chief of the Naval Staff of the Indian Navy, India
Alice Guitton

Alice Guitton

Director General for International Relations and Strategy, Minister for the Armed Forces, France

Alice Guitton

Director General for International Relations and Strategy, Minister for the Armed Forces, France
PUBLICATIONS
VIDEO GALLERY
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#Raisina2021​ Inaugural Session #ViralWorld​ Outbreaks, Outliers and Out of Control

Play Video

#Raisina2021​ #ViralWorld​: Outbreaks, Outliers and Out of Control

Play Video

#Raisina2021​ #ViralWorld​: Outbreaks, Outliers and Out of Control

PHOTO GALLERY 2020

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